Nadia –Nurse/Cop/Community Centre Director? Nope. Student Affairs.

Nadia –Nurse/Cop/Community Centre Director?  Nope. Student Affairs.

#3 - Nadia Rosemond had a lot of ideas about her future when she was in high school.  Influenced by family and popular television shows, it ended up being her friends who set her on the path to her future while attending the University of Guelph.  Nadia’s story includes both “OMG, I want to do this” moments as well as “what have I DONE” moments.  Take a listen to hear how she has ended up working in a field she didn’t even know existed until she applied for a student job. 

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The below transcript is A.I generated with light editing and may not be 100% accurate.

Transcript
Jonathan Collaton:

Good morning, good afternoon, or good evening, wherever you are, and wherever you are welcome. Hi, I'm Jonathan Collaton. And this is my podcast, career crossroads. And on this show, I try to figure out where my career path will take me by asking other people about theirs. That's the basic concept. But if you want a more thorough explanation of why this show exists, I did an eight minute introductory episode where I go a lot deeper into my rationale for creating the show. This week's guest is Nadia. And after the interview, I'm going to reflect a bit about what she had to say. And I also have some podcast updates. But first the interview. Nadia, thank you so much for being on my podcast.

Nadia Rosemond:

Thanks for having me I'm excited.

Jonathan Collaton:

I'm excited to and I wanted to have you as one of the first episodes for two reasons. One of which is that when I first developed the concept for this, I emailed you about it, because I know you have a podcast that you do for your job, or in the field of work that you're in, which will remain hidden until the very end, because that's how we know each other. And so I don't want to give away the answer to too easily. I haven't talked about what I do yet on this podcast. So for all my family that are listening, they know. But if there's anybody else listening, they won't know already. So yeah, thanks so much for being on the show. So let's just bring it right back. Let's go back to back in time, when you're 16 years old, or somewhere in high school. What did you want to be when you were older?

Nadia Rosemond:

I went through a phase where I actually remembered today that I wanted to be a nurse.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay,

Nadia Rosemond:

and I don't know. And I'm a kid of television and movies. And I think I wanted to be a nurse, not a doctor because of ER, the show ER. Like I was like, I want to save lives. I want to do that sort of thing. And I got

Jonathan Collaton:

That show was huge in it's time.

Nadia Rosemond:

it's time so good. And I had a family member that was a nurse and kind of discouraged me like towards the end. But for there was a good chunk of time where I wanted to be a nurse, I also wanted to be a cop. And then I had a nightmare that I got shot. And then I changed my mind. The nightmare was too real. It was too real. So yeah, there was a good chunk of time wanted to be a nurse. And then I remember in grade 12. So I'm the air that we had all OAC.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay.

Nadia Rosemond:

People that well, OAC see if you live in the province of Ontario was like a bonus year before going to university or ideally you would do grade 13 to get credits for university.

Jonathan Collaton:

Gotcha.

Nadia Rosemond:

So I remember like in 12, 13, you kind of meet with the guidance counselor, I didn't really know I I didn't really know what I wanted to be I had the skills to maybe do things with children because I was a great camp counselor over the years like that was my summer job. Okay, like I was great with kids. And I also taught piano like I learned piano since like kindergarten, and then at a certain age, you kind of make you help do the Miss lessons have kids that have missed like their schedule the lesson. So I would teach piano so I had the children background, and I think I wanted that, like not really teach but actually run a community center.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so you had a lot going on?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah.

Jonathan Collaton:

A lot, a lot of plans.

Nadia Rosemond:

A lot of plans, but not like no direction. And I remember like, going to like the guidance counselor and just not even asking for help just being like, teacher just sayings anything that make the meeting short, right? And then like bailing, but I'm like, I really don't know, there's all these options, but I don't know. I like everything. And I see that I'm good at certain things, but I don't know what I want to do every day.

Jonathan Collaton:

So er was influencing you, your aunt who was a nurse was influencing you. The fact that you taught piano was influencing you, you had a lot of different things that were all kind of pushing you in different directions. So what was the determining factor then for the day High School is over what are you going to be doing?

Nadia Rosemond:

I think I went on that like that teacher train as a as an idea to be like, Okay, let me stick with this. Or at least when people ask me, this is a good answer. Okay. You just needed to have something to say I need an answer so that people are like, she knows what she's doing even though I'm like, I don't really know. I like everything. And so throughout university I was an English major at the University of Guelph - go Griffins go. and I'm began to minor in drama, then political science. So I was thinking, Okay, if I do want to be a teacher, at least I kind of know what my teachables are.

Jonathan Collaton:

The teachables yeah.

Nadia Rosemond:

And then in the summer is still doing like camp counselor and teaching. still having that just being like, I really like the community center vibes, like I see myself being maybe like a director of like a community like so not like so being involved with children, but also being a part of the community and being involved something bigger, I like that energy, and then go through diversity and I meet some amazing friends and they're like, you want to be an RA Resident Advisor or assistant and I'm like, What is that? And they're like, it's kind of like being a camp counselor. Or students that I'm like, I'm the best camp counselor. This Job's made for me. Let's do it.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so I'm so interested to that your majors are just totally separate from the other things that like you have all these other interests and yeah, and drama, and poly sigh like, how did that? What was your interest in in politics? I guess that because I majored in poly sci or I started with it, but I switched out of it. But what was the reason for that?

Nadia Rosemond:

I don't, I think I just love the topics and a little bit of the law. And I don't know, like, why things I'm trying to remember. I remember I took one course that was like the history of politics. And then it had excerpts from different types of books like, mine calm and like stall, like all these excerpts. And I was like, wow, this is wild to be able to read these other perspectives, like the other side of like, this historical narrative and stuff like that. And I just, I don't know, and I think the writing aspect of it too, like for me, for like the social sciences, I, it's easy for me to write things down. It's easy for me to read something and get meaning from it. So I went to what I was strong at.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so did the major stay consistent the whole way through?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, actually, yeah. I was drama major for like, maybe the first two years and then I got spooked off by like some of the acting classes. And then I committed to poly sci as my minor.

Jonathan Collaton:

And primary?

Nadia Rosemond:

And primary was English. I stuck through with English.

Jonathan Collaton:

I wonder how many people ended up doing like double majors or minors. And, as I always assumed I did a double major, but I guess I assumed that was like an outlier thing. But I feel like everybody now is doing double majors. Everybody wants a second skill set.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah.

Jonathan Collaton:

Which makes sense. I mean, it's good to have something. I heard a career counselor say something one time, but having parallel paths, and it's important to have two things are always working on. And that way, if one of them doesn't work out, you have a really good other option that you're interested in. And you've already been begun working on that. So that's always kind of stuck with me. So

Nadia Rosemond:

I think I want I think I saw also I could be a law teacher, like I had a really cool law teacher in high school. So for me, and I was like, I could do drama, but not really.

Jonathan Collaton:

You can be dramatic in the courtroom.

Nadia Rosemond:

Exactly.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so yeah, all these things sort of stitch together in some way or another, but they provided you with a lot of options.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah.

Jonathan Collaton:

All right. And so getting back to being the residence advisor, so you get to be a camp counselor in residence. And how did that experience pan out for you?

Nadia Rosemond:

That was no, I like to this day, the experiences and the and the training. And even the relationships I've made from that era, that time in my life has stood the test of time, like my training as ra still helps me in my job day to day. I don't know if people like have that similar, like experience or that similar benefit from like a job when they're younger. By just the like, being prepared for like on call situations. Like being a first responder, the small see counseling, so to speak. So being able to like, kind of advise people in crisis, media conference, conflict, all these skills..

Jonathan Collaton:

Those are all like very transferable skills, they would fit into so many of the different careers that you were looking at.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, like, like priceless.

Jonathan Collaton:

gotcha.

Nadia Rosemond:

And then like, I liked that I was successful. In my first year, I applied to be a senior RA, two years in a row. And then I had to do a victory lap at Guelph to finish my degree, and then I helped be like, our RAD's are like kind of like additional rays you hire in the event that maybe someone on your team leaves or can't fulfill it. So back back up RAD's. And so I for that summer, I helped with like training the RDS. And I did my victory lap. And then I graduated. And then I remember thinking, like, I actually applied for a job at Guelph during my victory lap. But I'm glad I didn't get it because I think I was applying because I wanted to stay in Guelph..

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh, yeah.

Nadia Rosemond:

You know, I mean, I didn't get the big picture of what I was.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, I've seen that before with students who work in, in the Reds field where, because you and I really, I guess anybody who works in any student facing role as a student in university, you really, because you've had such a good experience, you just want to extend it right? And it feels like it's home. It's the place you should be. But sometimes you've got to step away from that to learn what it's like in other places, because every university is going to have a slightly different vibe to it a different set of rules. And you've got to understand how to work with people who are in one of those other places with those different set of rules.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I'm so I'm glad. Of course, I was disappointed. But after a couple of days, I was like, no, that happened for a reason. That's okay. Like, that's not meant for me. Yeah, and I was applying for the wrong reasons. I really didn't. to like, if I want to be in this industry, I really got to like, be genuine about it. So I graduated and then for like, a year after I kind of hustled with, I think I had like three part time jobs, what were they? I was piano teaching more full time, like I had my own class, which was cool, like my own students. And I think I was an ECE teacher, like with mommy and me programming. And then in the that would be like, in the morning, and then in the afternoon, I would do after school program. Hmm.

Jonathan Collaton:

So you didn't need a specific degree to do ECE stuff?

Nadia Rosemond:

No, I don't even know how I got that gig. I don't know how I can't remember how I applied if I went to like,

Jonathan Collaton:

Also like we work in Super acronym, heavy jobs. ECE is early childhood education in case anybody doesn't know.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So those are the early air the years I don't know if it still exists, but I used to look for jobs that like it was like a job. bank.ca like.ontario.ca.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, like provincial job boards.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. Just like anything that had like some stuff with community children I just applied. So I had like, yeah, so I would like Mondays and like Saturdays would be piano teaching. early mornings would be like the mommy and me programming. And then after school, I would do the homework club.

Jonathan Collaton:

So you certainly definitely were hustling you were busy hustling, a lot of stuff. But how many hours a week were you working?

Nadia Rosemond:

Oh, I can't even remember.

Jonathan Collaton:

More than a regular job though between the three.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I remember my hair wasn't a fro. I felt like my hair reflected the time I was in it was just wild. Because I and I, but it was I'm glad I had the jobs. It was amazing experience. It still like totally transferable skills. But it was hard not knowing what I really wanted to do like, full time.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah. So when you still applying for jobs like so what are they the res jobs you're talking about we would call that student affairs right? So you're you're looking at a job in

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. student affairs when you were at Guelph. And that whole year afterwards, were you just kind of coasting...like coasting in the way that you were happy with what you were doing so you weren't looking ahead too far? Yeah, I was. Yeah, kind of coasting. And then I think what happened was, it was so interesting, like the cohort I'm a part of, I think we're so unique. So that I mean of the cohort like my group of friends that I went to golf with, we were all raised together. And a lot of us are now still in student affairs. So after graduating, a lot of them stayed within Student Affairs, the other work that they worked in golf for their first entry job. And I remember like visiting them and being like, Oh, I do like this, like I, I would love to train our rays and have a team and all this stuff. And then one of my friends was doing a training session at Humber College that I went to, like, sit in the audience. And I was like, Oh, my God, I want to do this.

Jonathan Collaton:

So you were lucky that you were surrounded by people who were in that field. Even if you weren't there yet. You got to see them doing their job. And that's what really led you towards realizing that's what you wanted to do.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, made a big difference. Seeing like, the behind the scenes sort of speaks with seeing like, the like, I know, the good stuff as an RA like, you know, you kind of like remember the good times. You don't know that, like, the stuff.

Jonathan Collaton:

you always blackout that the bad times, right? You don't remember all the like late nights? And I mean, I do because there's stories that I still get to tell from those like the fun ones. But then there's the not so fun ones that you don't always talk about. And I think everybody does this with university where you just have this nostalgia for how much fun it was, but like I forget about the times I literally was like in tears trying to write essays because I just I want to just remember the fun nights because

Nadia Rosemond:

I know my gosh, it's true.

Jonathan Collaton:

It's like I feel like the fun nights are what made me who I am.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah,

Jonathan Collaton:

But like, no, they're like, barely surviving and getting through, It also made me through, made me who I am.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, for sure. So like just seeing that. I was like, Oh my god, I genuinely now now I genuinely want to do this. I could see myself having an impact. Having a team like, and I don't care where I was, what was different was like, I don't care where I end up. I wanted to do it.

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh that's good.

Nadia Rosemond:

So my energy changed.

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh, yeah. See, that's, I think a really important thing with people who are just coming out of university that some people get limited in terms of where their family is, or friends or partners that they, they don't want to leave a certain town or they always just thought they'd be back in their hometown or something like that. But when you have when you're looking at a field, where there's only X number of jobs in any given city, which it kind of is with jobs in residence at the university, like every town only has so many universities or colleges that you can work at, and there has to be an opening there that you have to be able to get. So you're you are sort of limited by what's available. It's not that it's you can't be super choosy, but I think like most schools have pretty good reputations for the res departments. So it's not like you need to be choosy either, right? You know that wherever you're going to get a job is going to be a good fit.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So that was what changed, which I was like, I didn't want to. I didn't pigeon myself, pigeonhole myself to like only be in Toronto I looked, I expand to be like, you know what, I want to do this so bad. I open it to like another...

Jonathan Collaton:

Are you from Toronto?

Nadia Rosemond:

I'm from Toronto. Yeah, I'm born and raised from Toronto four one, six,

Jonathan Collaton:

We just call it the six now.

Nadia Rosemond:

Oh, I know. That's true.

Jonathan Collaton:

Come on

Nadia Rosemond:

The six. Thanks, Drake. And I was I just expanded, like, where I applied. So I applied like outside of Toronto and other provinces, like as they popped up, and then what was really cool, a the position opened up at Humber College, the place that inspired me. And I'm like, Okay,

Jonathan Collaton:

How perfect is that?

Nadia Rosemond:

So I applied, and I got an interview, and it went well. And then I had a really good conversation with the Manage hiring manager at the time. Can I say names?

Jonathan Collaton:

If you want to, for sure yeah.

Nadia Rosemond:

Okay, so Mike Kopinak, one of my favorite

Jonathan Collaton:

How long was all this after you had bosses. And he was like, we're offering it to someone else. But graduated? But a year later? Or a little bit longer? like, you had a really good interview, and I hope that you get hired somewhere. And like, I see you at conferences, and I'm like, thank you so much. It was a great experience. And like, thank you. I hope I see you at conferences too. And then,

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, about a year. first, I don't know if a friend told me this, but someone told

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay.

Nadia Rosemond:

It was like June.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, they typically our summer hires. me like the person hasn't started yet. I think they're

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So yeah. And I guess the other thing I want to share with people that's helped me along the way to not

Jonathan Collaton:

because I missed it. On your point about an How do I word this like, not in a negative way of like that. waiting for the person to accept the offer, like who they offered It's who you know, but in a positive way. Sometimes it's who who you know, it's true, that really is valuable. I know, I You know what, like, the whole idea behind networking, I know to. And that whole week, I was like, I want this person to say that a lot of people have a hard time with that and what it looks like and what it could be. And I think because I was involved no. And to say no. And they're gonna offer me I don't care if throughout University as an RA, I had managers, and those managers don't stay at golf, they go at other places. So my manager at Gualph Melissa Gallo ended up working at Humber being second place. It's amazing. I don't care. Like the worked with Mike. So when he was going through resumes, and trying to like see people she was like, I know, Nadia is like whole week. I was like, say no, say no, say no. And then a week you could you should interview her. She was really good. I got an interview. I proved myself, right. And then thankfully, like pass. And then like, next week, Mike calls me and he's like, do person said, No, yay. And then I got an offer. And I'm like, Yes. And it's like, yeah, so it's June 2006, and I ended up like full circle moment, I ended up working at the place that like, you have any references? And I'm like, yeah. inspired me to get into the field again, kind of had the exact same thing about how I got my first job where I had gone to Wilfrid Laurier University, my sister had gone to the University of Waterloo, which was right down the street, and she was a couple years younger than me. And she had worked in a summer job as a student, and they were looking for a supervisor for those students for the following summer. So it's not that her bosses, you know, thought that I would be better in any way that because I have the same last name as someone who they hired. But just having someone say, like, Oh, my brother does this type of stuff, and he's interested in the job. Just having people hear your name from someone who they already trust can be valuable, right? It's not like you need to, you need to know someone and they need to know how skilled you are. It's like other people vouching for you is what a lot of it really is, right? Like, you just need to get your foot in the door. And if someone else can do that for you, take advantage of that, right and then end up you know, you've got to prove yourself in the interview, they're going to hire you just based on the fact that someone else knows you and said you were good. They just helped you get to the interview. But then yeah, it's up to you in the interview, you have the same chance as everyone else once, once you're at that point.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. And I know the downside of it is like, if you don't have a network, then you have, you know, it's a harder hustle. So I think what I'm trying to say is that, like, get involved as much as possible along the way. And like every, I don't know what the proper phrases but there's always like, there's this quote about like, every encounter is like a billboard for you like, so like along the way, make sure that your billboards positive that people are like, I really like that person, if something comes up, I'm going to keep them in mind. Because even though there's all technology and LinkedIn, and all these things, like what's interesting to see is that a person's word is still kind of gold.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, for sure.

Nadia Rosemond:

People was like, just you know, so and so. And it's like, Yeah, and I and I, and I try to use that network. If people ask me or I asked I try not to make it be the be all and end all because I know I could just imagine the other end of it of not having a network and trying to get in Yeah, but I'm also I also tell students when they asked me about how to get in, I'm like that I have to acknowledge this exists. And this is a way to navigate it.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, no, it's true. Like, there's...when I was doing a bunch of research trying to figure out how to make a podcast, one of the things I don't know if I came across it, or I just figured it out based on other things I've heard is, like, nobody's a better promoter for you than you, you've got to make sure you're out there. Like, what did you say about billboards? It's the same idea, right? Like you, you need to be the one to push forward. The idea that you are a good person for a job, and you've got to get out there and meet people. And there's ways to do it. If even if you aren't involved in something that's related to the field you want to go into, like you said, LinkedIn or find conferences or find a mentor in that field who's willing to, to shadow that you can shadow or they're willing to train you. And it doesn't have to be big things. It's like little things can add up, right. And the more you get out there, and people get to know your name in the field that you want to be in, the more likely it is something good will happen.

Nadia Rosemond:

And even earlier, when I thought we were wind back to like my high school, there was a like a couple of summers where I volunteer, I didn't get paid to be a camp counselor. And then one summer, one of the camp counselors left the program early. And they asked me because I guess I maybe I started as a volunteer, and that's when I started getting paid to be a camp counselor. And that helped me on my resume and applying for the City of Toronto and so on. So I know like us city councilor. Yeah, it was I yeah, and summer, I was at driftwood Community Center. I was at the school near my house north of Eglinton, but I don't remember the name. And I know like, I know, in this era, like some people can't afford to volunteer, and they need to work. But I would also say if your schedule allows to volunteer on the side, because, like, I feel like the like volunteering is also network building. Right? You're I know, you're like working for free. And it's hard. And it's not fun. But the contacts you made and making those, those arenas even with like maybe who you volunteer with, they have their own, it's just meeting people is so important that I know, like, and I'm an inch of introvert. So I've been lucky that I like utilize volunteering and all these opportunities to kind of build people that I know.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so getting back to the career side of things, and not just advice for the world that we're trying to provide. So you're at you're at Humber, you get the job. And that's like a living type position. Right? So, which is maybe unusual for people who don't work in the world of Student Affairs, where you can be a staff member to university and live in residence on campus to help be there if there's an incident that needs staff assistance.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yes, so I was a residence life coordinator and RLC at other institutions, sometimes it's a residence manager - RM. I was responsible for my first year I used to know the numbers by memory but now I don't so I was responsible for like, it's kind of like being a principal I would say for a building. I don't want to say Warden because that's not like that.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah residence is prison.

Nadia Rosemond:

We're like a principal and so you oversee the student team

Jonathan Collaton:

Residence is only prison in the COVID world where they literally can't leave their house.

Nadia Rosemond:

I know, awe man.

Jonathan Collaton:

No, hopefully that's not how it is this year,

Nadia Rosemond:

hopefully. Right? But so I'm responsible for a building of students a team overseeing and encouraging to do programming and events. And then what I like a lot of people don't like this but I actually like the discipline behind it. I liked being on call I was I was good at it. I feel like I just being on call over the years definitely has fine tuned my adaptability, strength, like I'm able to be like really cool under pressure. And just be like, Okay, what are the ideas are the solutions go and then I could crash after but on call like, I'm just getting like a rush.

Jonathan Collaton:

Like, there's a problem. I've got to fix it. Let's fix it.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. And so you're on call here first responder and you kind of like cuz your aresko only do so much so you kind of handle like maybe the bigger incidences so larger parties, sexual assault, suicides, theft whatever you...

Jonathan Collaton:

Weed back in the day.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. Drugs. Ooh. Yeah. So the bigger things and then you follow up with the students and I there's some counseling, advising referrals involved or like, teachable, teachable moments in terms of like, you're part of a community This is why you need to respect the noise, respect, quiet hours, respect your neighbor, your roommate fill in the blank. What about the fun side of the job though? The like, program planning and assisting our A's with their programming. That was fun. Yeah. So I love my teams. I think one of the things I'm like most proud of is that and obviously I mean, I'm I'm not actually I shouldn't say credit for developing the teams because it's like, when you interview the raise, you kind of get together with your other managers coordinators, and you kind of pick your team and like, vouch for why you want someone and then people give you feedback. This person might work or work with you. And or not. So you kind of build the teams together. But also, I'm really proud of the teams that I've been a part of that I made that people are still friends. Yeah, like they're still lifelong friends. I'm just like, Yes, I made that.

Jonathan Collaton:

So that's the type of stuff about the job that really appealed to you. How long did you stay in that role before you decided to look at something else? And was it a contract job because I know a lot of those are initially contract.

Nadia Rosemond:

So the contract role, the max time is three years, I would have done more like not too much, too. I probably had maybe I could have done five years. I probably would have had had five years in me.

Jonathan Collaton:

There's some schools with five year contracts.

Nadia Rosemond:

For sure I sure I would have had, because I'm at, at Humber my role was able to change. So in the beginning, I got one building and I got to, I went to the Lakeshore Campus. So there was a bit of like,

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh, yeah, like a nice campus too.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, nice movement, like learning, you know, different different environments, different areas.

Jonathan Collaton:

So the job didn't really stick it doesn't stay consistent for all those years. And we're doing it it changes every year. Yeah, I just a good. I don't think that happens maybe in a lot of other jobs. Like you don't have a full team rotation every year and a lot of other jobs, but you'd have a probably 75% rotation in your job. Like, there's so many RA's are going to come back every year. So it's presents new challenges every single year.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. And the students are different, especially at now. I think about it in the college environment. Like and we have Guelph Humber, the university but there's still a majority of the students are college students. So there might be there for like, one year, two year programs. So there's high turnover, but so that's why the mix, the roll was different, which was nice.

Jonathan Collaton:

And when you were doing this, this would have been like, right when things like Facebook were just blowing up too, right?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yes, I remember getting Facebook invites and like declining cuz I'm like, I don't waht this.

Jonathan Collaton:

From students? you're like, I don't see what's happening.

Nadia Rosemond:

And then I think, oh, there was a rumor to be a party during the Christmas holiday break. And typically at universities and colleges, that's when you close you shut down. And people should be going and some some some institutions, you have it a little bit open for maybe international students, people who live far from home to stay, but most of the time you close. And I remember there was a rumor that they're supposed to be a party. So I got on Facebook to like, find out like the details. And if this was happening.

Jonathan Collaton:

This isbefore people knew how to hide stuff. Yeah. Now they've learned.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, there was no party. But yeah, that's what that's what finally made me go onto Facebook.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, gotcha. So you did three years in that job? And then what was the next thing? And did you find it kind of daunting, knowing you had like a deadline where your contract was gonna be up, and you had to find a new job? Or

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I was so bummed about it. And, but I'm like, Okay, I'll... And I really loved Humber College. Like I really, that was one of like, I don't know why there's something special about that place, too. So in my third year, there was a position that opened up in their International Student Center, like a mat leave position as an international student advisor. And I'm like, let me apply because like, this is ending. And it's It was so painful, because as an RA, I don't know if you've ever experienced when, like, a manager leaves partway in the year and you're just like, why did you leave us like, Oh, yeah, you feel like personally attacked. So I didn't have that happen. But I... you've seen it?

Jonathan Collaton:

Well, I remember at an end of year gala, when my contract was running up, and I had summer Dons that summer. And Dons, RA's, same thing. But I remember saying at that gala, at my like speech, at the end of the year, I was like, oh, and I'll be moving on this summer. And I could see the shock on the face of one of my Dons. They like, How could you do this to me? And I realized I hadn't told them yet. They didn't understand I had a three year contract that was ending. And so yeah, that felt not great. I really wish I could have read on that one and let them know in advance, but

Nadia Rosemond:

I've seen it happen before. And then and I just so was felt like as an RA, you're just like, Why are you leaving us but I also as I got older understanding, like they have their life and they gotta, you know, they're not gonna be here forever. Right? So anyway, it was really hard applying clay didn't want to be that type of manager. But in the end, I was like, you have to like this is life. And telling them was so hard. I think I cried well, by and I at that time, also the structure change that Humber so my boss at the time was Shawn Carson. And he was great. And he like helped lead the conversation. And so I was successful in getting the International Student Advisor role and that was a good experience to that helped me and like, it helped me get like, my current position probably wouldn't happen if I didn't have that experience working with international students.

Jonathan Collaton:

So you kind of like in a way forced out isn't the right word because it's a set contract. Well, you know that there's a deadline and there's a time you have to leave. But if you had the choice, you probably would have stayed it sounds like, but because that contract ended, you got forced into finding another fit and you found something that fit what you are now looking back it totally benefits you.

Nadia Rosemond:

Totally.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay. So what with that job? How long...it was at was a mat leave...so a one year contract, give or take? And then you do that for a year. And what's the plan after that? Because I guess again, that's the end of a one year contract.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yes.

Jonathan Collaton:

And you're just floating free looking for what's next.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yes. And at that time, I I those regs, so I had two contract gigs. I was itching for benefits.

Jonathan Collaton:

I was I'm so glad you bring this up. Because this is one thing I want people who are listening to realize it's like a lot of early jobs are going to be contract are not always going to have benefits. But sometimes you just got to do what you got to do. Because it's it's a, the experience is worth it. And, you know, even if it's not the money or the benefits you want, it's gonna bring you to a better place down the line.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah,

Jonathan Collaton:

yeah. So anyway, you're itching for the benefits

Nadia Rosemond:

I'm itching for benefits.

Jonathan Collaton:

You would love to have a dentist.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I want to go to the dentist. I'm freaking out about my teeth. Even though they were fine. I like want vacation. Like I just wanted

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah that sarcasm about the dentist. Vacation is more what you were interested in.

Nadia Rosemond:

Well, you're right. I wanted those things. And then, and I wasn't I knew the person would come back like yeah, to the job. So I'm like, so I started looking for and I started missing residents. Okay, sorry, missing residents again, and I'm like, I kind of want, I have more in me. So then at University of Toronto, Scarborough, I saw a posting, and then it was within the residence program. At the time, the position was like training and programming coordinator. So this was a nice, this was a unique one, because you're kind of responsible for like, kind of like the fun things of an RLC job, like training supporting the areas of programming. There was some on call, but I wasn't responsible for the discipline side that went to the RLC. So I applied and I remember like not knowing too much about Scarborough, like I remember hearing about it, but only knowing really the downtown campus. So like, going for the interview was like my first time like ever seeing it. And then I was successful. And I was and I got the position, I was like, Yes, back to residence. And then once I got a taste of like being back on call again, I was like, I made a huge mistake.

Jonathan Collaton:

And you so you must have moved all the way across the city. You're like, basically the farthest western part of the city at Humber, and you move to the farthest eastern part of the city, which is a long way in Toronto. It's like 38 kilometers or something like that. So yeah, you're totally changing up where you live. And really the the reach you have on like a day to day basis, because Toronto is so big. It's not like you're gonna go downtown, every weeknight if you live out on the eastern tip of Scarborough, and you are live in position.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, no, actually the training and programming was off campus.

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh, okay.

Nadia Rosemond:

So maybe that's why I had a hard time with it. Because I'm like, I feel like I'm old school. And like, I want if I'm on call, I want to be on campus or close.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah

Nadia Rosemond:

I would always panic about and I but I was lucky. Like, I never maybe once in that year, I had one incident where I was like, you know, I don't have to go like campus places helping but I want to be present. And I drove down. But other but just that anxiety, and also the year of being an international with a detox. So I had already like,

Jonathan Collaton:

got it on your system?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So then going back to it, it didn't. It was harder, it was harder going back to it harder than I thought. And also, I think I wanted more control. I think I would have if it maybe if it was an RLC position, and I had more autonomy of it, I probably would have enjoyed it more. It was hard. Like just doing like, training and programming. I feel like I wanted more.

Jonathan Collaton:

So like as a less positive experience than some of the other jobs you had?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. still good. Like, yeah, like still like...

Jonathan Collaton:

I think it's fair to accept. And it's good to accept that like, not everything is amazing all the time. And that's one of the things I want people to understand when I'm doing these interviews is like, we shouldn't just gloss over jobs and pretend like every job is amazing. Like sometimes you do jobs that you find that you're not the right fit for, and it's not perfect for you and it can still be be good. But like if you then had to jump back to it, No, probably not.

Nadia Rosemond:

And I think I towards the end, I got better at it. But in the beginning, I kept comparing. I don't think that happens often when people move from institution and institution. I can no matter what they might no matter what I was gonna say residence roles, but not even like, it's hard for you not to compare. And yeah, my old school, you know, that was a classic line. People do that all the time. I know all the time. I end the beginning, I was really bad at it towards the end. I think I got I got over it. I was like stop comparing. It's completely different.

Jonathan Collaton:

Well, and if you had like multiple places where you're like, Oh, it's not like Guelph, it's not like Humber two, tqo super positive experiences. Yeah, it definitely. Yeah.

Nadia Rosemond:

So I, by the time I learned that lesson, I was like, like a year in and then another position opened up that utsc in leadership, like in student life. And I was like, oh, student life like I've always I've only known residents really like that's a bigger outreach, like a bigger impact alomst.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah residence is typically a smaller percentage of the overall population Like at UCSC, it's like, under 10%.

Nadia Rosemond:

Like 765 beds at the time I worked there.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah out of 14,000 students now, but whatever it would have been back then still, it's smaller.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I was like, I was intrigued by it. And I was like, I could do it. It's like the training and programming part of what I'm doing. But for a larger scale, I did the prep for the interview. And I was like, there was some good questions, and it was like it during the interview. I was like, force like, flip and make sure that as I answered stuff that I wasn't you like in my residence box of answering it was like, No, like, what I've done in the residence setting is applicable to the campus this way. Like that gets, you know, that was, that was a good challenge. And then I was successful, and I got that position. And that was really cool to be a part of like, sometimes in residence, you're like part of the residence bubble? II? Oh, yeah. The fishbowl the fishbowl effect, we was called talk about, like, what we in training, we tell the RA is like, you're the fish and like, you don't realize it, but people are looking at you when they're observing your behavior and your role modeling. But also, it's a fishbowl, I would say, because it's so easy for us to create our own world on campus. And just like, like the amount of things that happen in a day is like a week in residence, like the friendships, the dramas, things that happen, the experiences, it's so intense, that you kind of ignore the rest of campus. So it was nice to be in student life. And to like, be aware of the rest of the campus and be aware of other units and like Student Union work and orientation. Like just seeing the all the other layers. I'm like, Wow, this is amazing. It's just so interesting.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah. So you get into that role, and you're trying out all these new things, right? And how long were you doing that before either you got the itch to try something different? Or was there a catalyst kind of in the office where someone encouraged you to try a different role?

Nadia Rosemond:

Both. I always tell this to my team members, because I noticed this in myself, I get a three year itch

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay.

Nadia Rosemond:

I find like the first year you're a newbie, you're like, Oh, this is cool. I'm nervous. Second year, you're like, I got this. I know, this is not new to me. And third year, ideally, I think you should be like, I could do this with my eyes closed. And then you get a little bit bored. So like, and that's when I that's what happens to me, my third year I get an itch. And but like, I could do it, I could keep doing this. But I'm a little bit bored. Like, I figured it out. Like what next? And then I think at the time would help was our team was changing a lot. So there were a lot of new people coming on board. So that spice things up and then my, my boss at the time, recognize that I've had an edge. She's like, you're bored. And I'm like, how did you? You know? And she's like, like, just think about what you want to like, what I could do to help you during this time, like, what might you need? And like, I want to make sure that you're like and I'm like hot, so nice. So like I went to conferences. And then I think because there was such high turnover on our team. I ended up kind of being like the senior person on that side of our team. So kind of like managing people like yeah, non official, not officially, but kind of like managing and...

Jonathan Collaton:

When people know that you know the answers because you've been around they're going to come to you with questions.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So I can't I kind of been like started being like a little lead on the team. And like, I knew bit of everyone's role, like high and low points. Yeah. And it was it was a good, that was a nice change. And then

Jonathan Collaton:

it was just like an informal thing, though?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, it was informal and then the idea was there for a potential role. And I got the experience, like kind of write it. My boss was like, why don't you write your own

Jonathan Collaton:

Write your own promotion job description? It's pretty good spot to be in.

Nadia Rosemond:

I know. And then so starting on that getting the experience of like managing a team,

Jonathan Collaton:

Double my salary

Nadia Rosemond:

And change the title, you know? And like learning from her as well like being like, why did you decide this this and like, like, what, what's your strategy and what happens and like it was good to pick her brain. That was Liza Arnason. I forgot to mention her name. Like that was a really good boss. I learned a lot from her. Like how she managed the team and her strategic thinking about like, we're, like, I didn't...at the time I'm just a coordinator, but not knowing that she had the vision to like, add people and grow to reflect the growth that utsc and the growth like so we, at the time I was there, maybe there were like 90 clubs, like 90 ish clubs. 100 if we were lucky, and and over the years, it was like 200 if we were lucky, like 300m 300-400 like I grew. So like, as the campus life grew, our department was growing to reflect like, students want to do something. There's an energy here.

Jonathan Collaton:

So your job in that, that promotion you got it sounds like one I know that you did. You got to keep adding new things to it as the campus grew. And so even in that role that you're in It wasn't like a stagnant just rinse and repeat every year, stuff just kept changing.

Nadia Rosemond:

Always like the team was changing. campus was like utsc was growing and changing, had big like, still has a big plan like. So that was exciting to be a part of like seeing it. And also, what when I was at UTSC, I did make a commitment to myself that I would stay there past three years. Because thinking back to my career at the time, I had like contract jobs, there were short term. So I want it for me. I don't know if this still applies. But for me, I got advice that it was important to make sure on my resume that I had something that was like, a good chunk of time. So it didn't seem like I was just like, switching.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah. Which I guess is so different in different fields, right. At some field. It's like jump around as fast as you can that just shows you have the skill set for all these different roles. And then in other fields, like people want to see some level of stability.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, like so like, I didn't want people to think like Why does she keep leaving? Or is she not being kept?

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh, that's another see. That's the other side. Yeah. The easy version is like, Oh, do they just want to jump around like a mercenary for wherever the best money is? But like, no, sometimes it's, maybe you get pushed out. And that can't look good always.

Nadia Rosemond:

People's don'e want to keep you Yeah exactly. So I was in my, I already had the goal, like four to five years, I want to like have a nice chunk of time doing this, learn from it, and then maybe go to St. George campus or somewhere else or go back to Humber, I don't know, right? And then but I'm getting gaining good experience of being a manager. And then at utsc, our department, we our sister department is our international student center. So we're like two teams in one. And the manager of that area when I at leave. And this is when my one year as an international student advisor at Humber kicked in, paid off because I was able to get that position and do that one year, Matt leave, and like officially get managerial experience.

Jonathan Collaton:

Perfect. So were you formally not in that other manager role?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I wasn't

Jonathan Collaton:

No kidding. Okay. See, this is surprising to me. Because I come in shortly after this, where the way that we know each other is I on hired to work at the student leadership centre - not the student with Oh my God. That's why I worked at Lauria as a student! T he Department of Student Life at the time as it was known. And I didn't realize that you were not the manager before I got there, because you came back from the mat leave like back and like a month into me two months into me being there.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So Well, yeah. When we interviewed you, I was the manager for international I was doing Erika's mat leave.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah. But I didn't realize I thought you were just seconded from the Student Life manager roll over.

Nadia Rosemond:

It wasn't official yet.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay,

Nadia Rosemond:

I helped learn about HR stuff and help make the JD the job description. And then Emzhei got the official title. I was like darnit.

Jonathan Collaton:

You're like, I'm not the first.

Nadia Rosemond:

So yeah, but I'm grateful that I was able to do the once again, like, in the field that we're in, it's I feel like it's really important to get that international student experience. lens because, like, I remember as an RA, like not knowing enough about international students and always being like, Why don't they come to our events, it's so hard to kind of like, like, all the reasons that we kind of like other them, and then it's their fault. And then over the years when I've worked with that students and staff in those areas, just on learning all those things and being like, Oh my goodness, there's so much they have to like, deal with and hustle and survive and juggle and being legal and permits and like, I was like, I get it. So and my that one year was and it was also a good change. I remember I'm getting an itch. Yeah, so like to be it without another part of my team and doing this rule. It was a perfect like scratch.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so like your catalysts, were either getting the itch after three years or being pushed to learn new things by the manager in that role.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah.

Jonathan Collaton:

Now, when you came back from that one year, secondment, is that when you started looking at furthering your education as well, or was that already kind of in progress?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, it was. Because I felt like also in our field, it's a good idea like keep track of like, things are posted well, who gets hired for certain things with what credentials and seeing the trends? I think over the last couple of years, I remember in the residence world so when talking about there's a trend of like a lot of people from I think they were Canadian, they did school in the States and they would come back with Masters so there was a trend of like a lot of people within residence having masters and people getting a little bit antsy about that'd be like Oh crap, we got to get it. And then within Student Affairs stuff a lot of my peers like my like I mentioned before, a lot of my friends still like they were working with in residence staying within Student Affairs as well from my golf days. And they were like, completing their masters or like starting it and I'm like masters or what exact masters in adult education or student services, leadership development, so like a few like at a couple of institutions part time or full time doing it. So and also working at U of T We're very blessed, like part of our benefits, like is encouraged to, like, you know, take can continue studies class or to pursue a master's. So that was there, like, the setup is there to be like, if you want to learn more, like, and I'm lucky I had a supportive Boss, I was like, if you do it, we can like, you know, work with your schedule. So the environments there, do I want to go? No, I feel like I didn't want to like I like I'm like,

Jonathan Collaton:

This is a good idea, but I hate it. But i'll do it anyways.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, I don't know if I want to do more school. Felt like I said, goodbye officially, after my golf days. I didn't want to own your own money. Like I felt like I just paid off or I was still paying off Oh, OSAP, and I'm like, I don't know.

Jonathan Collaton:

I always wonder with things like student debt, what kind of the impact of that is when people are deciding on jobs or furthering education? Because, like, it feels really good, right? When you're like, I'm done paying off my loans. I don't want to get back into that.

Nadia Rosemond:

Like, but I, my brain was done. My brain was fried. I was my brain was like, I thought about it, too. I was like, maybe doing a Masters to like kind of still figure out what I wanted what I wanted to be, but my brain was done. And I didn't want to incur more debt. So I didn't. And now like I'm noticing, like, as people are becoming managers, they have this credential. And I'm like, I see the writing on the wall. I got to do it. This sucks. But let me do it. And then with that energy I applied and I didn't get in because I didn't really well, I was begrudgingly like applying, I didn't want to do it. I felt like I had to do it. And I applied to Boise. I didn't get in. And I was like see. So I was kind of like humbled by that. And then I'm like, Okay, let me let me think about this. And then so in the meantime, I did Continuing Studies classes at through u of t, I did their leadership essential certificate. So I treated as like this is a good warm up to get back into like being a student again, shallow in first. Yeah, let me do that they may do this build up. And then maybe when I apply to OISE again, I could refer that like that I have these like, I'm not a fresh student. I've, you know, been doing this. And the certificate really helped because they had a lot of courses about managing people managing a team so that I liked that because it was more hands on a clickable like, I learned something in the classroom, I did it immediately, like in a meeting or with a team. So that was valuable. And then I don't know, I don't know how long I waited. But then I ended up applying to Boise again. This time, I really intentionally wanted that. I was like, No, I really want to do this. I want to learn more like there's some really good courses. And I and I tried more with my like letter of intent and stuff like that. And I finally got in, and I got into the med for adult education and community development. Alright. And for me, I chose that one because it's so weird. I've, I've been in student affairs all this time. And I still have like a, I feel like I have a toe out. It's like I always I'm never sure if I'm in the right career. So for me it felt like doing this. I could take it anywhere. Whereas if I did Student Services, I'd be locked in.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, no, that's certainly without any further education like you...the consideration of is this if I do this, am I fully committed? Like is there any escapes the wrong word, but I can't think of a better one. Right? Where Yes. Like, is it transferable to other fields?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. So I was like, I want to make sure it's transferable. Like I always have like a toe out. For You know, I'm in this career, and I've invested so many years, but I'm always like, do I really want to do this? As I'm doing it? I don't know why. So I got into that program. And then that was a really good experience. Although I have to admit I like I, I was more drawn to like the certificate program because I do feel like it's more clickable. Whereas with the Boise stuff, the master's program, it was good. But I know I learned stuff I don't like I'm probably implementing it. I just don't see it firsthand.

Jonathan Collaton:

Right. There's a lot more. Some of that is very theoretical. I guess. Like with any education, there's always stuff. That's more theory. And so

Nadia Rosemond:

it's in my brain. Yeah, what's there? I enjoyed the classes, but I don't. And I probably apply it every day. I just don't know that I'm doing it. Maybe

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, maybe it's the role though, to maybe because of where you're at, like in the the manager role you're at when you were in that program. You're not doing all the hands on stuff in the same way anymore. So you're more just directing other people to create the programming based on the theories you've learned. Yeah. And so you don't see the results every day. But they're, they're there.

Nadia Rosemond:

That's true. Yeah. So yeah, that and I also I wanted, I wanted it more like I was ready to do the Masters because on like a self esteem level too. I felt like it would give me more confidence that I at least I have this credential. I have this education that supports me being in this managerial type or leadership position. So they also felt that I wanted that as well.

Jonathan Collaton:

Okay, so what was thee...you ended up, I know you what, last summer you finished the master's program?

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, last summer I graduated.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah, further education. Yeah. So you're done that. But then there was a shift in our department. So talk about that, because that kind of, I mean, that was the next step in the career trajectory for you that you didn't have to go anywhere. Things just sort of happened around you that put you in a position to try out a different role.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah, so our department like last fall, changed that structure. And then there was a new assistant dean position created that oversaw, overseas student life and International Student Center. So I'm in it right now as the interim. And like, that's been pretty exciting. I, and I know I hope people are not like, Oh, my God, this girl has like a horseshoe up her butt. Like, it's not. It's not exactly that. I think it's the it is timing, and, and maybe my years of investment at the institution, that's why there's been a lot of change,

Jonathan Collaton:

This has come up too in other conversations I've had, like, if you put yourself in the position to succeed, good things will potentially happen to you, right? So like you put you get in a role, and you do the hard work. And people see how hard you work. When it comes time to find someone to do a larger role, you're at the top of their mind, because you're already you're there, you know, the system. You You deserve it based on the work you've done. And we can call it luck if we want. But I mean, you got to put in work to get lucky.

Nadia Rosemond:

That's true. Yeah, it depends. Yeah. And just like, I think, what helped me was like this, demonstrating that I'm always like, I always want to learn, I'm like, I'm adaptable. I had six years of experience over the years, that's like, so transferable to like, any role. And that, like, I'm collaborative, I love teams, I love creating teams, I like working with people across the campus to get things done. And I love students, I like students as well, for sure, like seeing the impact on them. So like, I feel like those are just recipes for me being, like, spotted by people for certain opportunities, and then being also the other part of it is like saying yes, and like so always I'm, of course, I'm scared. I'm, sometimes I might be intimidated, but just be like, you know it? Yes, let me let me try this. Let me be challenged, like, maybe learn more from this. And then it'll help me some way in the future. So like, there's always an element of saying Yes,

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah. So. So that brings us to the modern day, and any more plans to go back and become a nurse at some point, or any of those initial thoughts that you had no teaching music?

Nadia Rosemond:

No, I did. I think I stopped when I started working at Humber because the phone calls were too much.

Jonathan Collaton:

Oh, yeah.

Nadia Rosemond:

And I dropped it then. So drive by it every now and then I'm like, wonder what's going on there. I think what's on my horizon is like, continuing with the Assistant Dean role and learning from my peers, especially what's exciting is that you see, we have like a new principal. And in this first year, as an institution, we created this new strategy. So being a part of that strategy process and like, knowing what they want for the next five years, it's like, whoa, I'm a part of this new change. That's exciting. So and then the team is different to like, a lot of people have come and gone so I have a new team, new people, which always gives me so now I get I don't get my energy from students anymore. Because my positions has like, is a little bit higher. I get more my energy more for my team. Mm hmm. Like my colleagues. So that's been nice to like be a part of like staff development on that, like professional development of staff, no longer like students. And I I'm contemplating I feel like but I got a conversation. Post Covod times when I was graduating about grad school and, and MBAs and masters like PhDs and all those things. And I'm, it's probably on my horizon. I don't know. Like, I like learning. It's just like, it was hard grad school is hard. But like right now being in grad school, like when I was in Guelph, we had Napster, ICQ, MSN Messenger, like simple things that distracted you. In being in grad school this past like a couple of years. There's like Netflix, you have the internet on your phone.

Jonathan Collaton:

That's a great point. Like you can open up...this happens all the time. Like I opened up Facebook to send a message to someone very specifically. But Facebook has an algorithm that puts things in front of my face that knows I'm going to be interested in. So then I start looking at what's on Facebook and then I forget why I opened it in the first place to message someone. Then I close it and then I'm like, Oh, no, wait, I still messaged that person. That type of distraction did not exist no years ago. So that's certainly something that people have to take into account now when there

Nadia Rosemond:

It was hard. Yeah, it was there's so many distractions, it was hard towards the end like physically saying no to events like that, like things that were happening with friends and family. They'll be like, I have to read these chapters. I have to write this paper and I Actually a better student like I didn't have many all nighters like, whereas in my undergrad, I would like see the sun come up in a train wreck for all nighters for me to like, I was better as a as a grad student, I plan more. And if I was up all night, I was editing. But then I went to bed by like, midnight, it was great. working full time, was another challenge. Whereas before, when we were an undergrad, that's you're just a student, like, that's all you got to do is be a student, but like, doing your masters working full time, I was managing a team, there's lots of changes going on, like trying to have a life trying to be cool with what people have been doing. Like it was hard, like, definitely making sacrifices to like, do well and understand and keep up to date. Because sometimes people those classes are like only a master students. So they're like, reading during the day, like, you go in class, they've read all the readings. And it was really hard not to compare and be like, I've only read like three out of the 10 articles, like I hope. I mean, like, contribute to this conversation. It was hard. It was hard being a student in this, like 20. I forgot even when I started but like 2019 to 2000..maybe 16. I started maybe it was like three to four years. It was it was challenging being a student. So I'm not jumping to be a PhD student.

Jonathan Collaton:

Yeah. You could maybe take some time you know, you've got some stability in terms of your career and what you're doing and take some time.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. Was there ever a moment with maybe jobs that you were interested in looking at that you either didn't get or didn't take? Where you wonder, like, would you have been on a totally different path? If if something else had happened slightly differently? Like, would you maybe not be in student affairs if something else had happened? Whould I not be in student affairs?

Jonathan Collaton:

I think was it maybe is a it's a tougher question with Student Affairs, people, because so many of us, like, that's what you knew you wanted to do, right? So when you jump into it, you're not really looking at things outside of that field of work. And so the only really, the options are like, well, if you weren't at utsc, maybe a different job interview would have panned out, and maybe you'd be out like Western, right? Like, they're not, they wouldn't probably drastically change your career path. I guess.

Nadia Rosemond:

Like I other maybe I was always tempted to like, consider other institutions or even other campuses. I actually applied because I still have a soft spot for Humber. I don't know why, but I do. I apply for a role at Humber. I wasn't successful. That was great. And I because I wasn't ready for the role that I applied for. And then it's so interesting that after that rule, I got proper experience and learning that and I would have would have worked out, but

Jonathan Collaton:

so it's like sometimes, sometimes things have to happen that aren't always good to set you on the path you probably should be.

Nadia Rosemond:

Yeah. Yeah, for sure. I think there's also like many choices, like sometimes you could be an expert within residence, or international or academic advising. So there's little, little doors that could open and close. And I'm glad that I've had two opportunities that kind of helped me see the international side and, and come back, so to speak, and have that experience, because oftentimes, it's sometimes hard for people from that have been in student life to jump to international stuff. And sometimes people from international jump, when they, when you've spent so much time in those realms, it's hard to do the jump to either my find for people. So I'm glad I've had those two moments. I think that I do think looking back. And I think part of the reason why I did the continuing adult ed and community development is that there's always a possibility of going back to that community center dream of like, being a part of like, you know, a community center director or something like that being involved in that sense that intrigues me or adult education. Like, when I was doing when I was doing my three part time jobs and like trying to figure things out, I did a life skills certificate at George Brown. And I was intrigued by like, adult education and like being a part of that in some way. So I think my M Ed kind of opens that door of being a part of adult Yeah, as well. That's your your parallel path. Yeah.

Jonathan Collaton:

All right. Well, thanks so much for sharing all this experience today. Obviously, I already knew a lot of this but didn't know all of it. So it's good to hear the whole story. And hopefully, there's, you know, some people out there who are gonna hear this that are gonna get something super valuable from it.

Nadia Rosemond:

Thanks, Jonathan.

Jonathan Collaton:

All right. So that is not yet. And one of the reasons I wanted to interview Nadia is I thought she was a great example of how a lot of people end up in the field of student affairs. And why that matters to me is because as you heard during the interview, that's what I do. I work in what One of the things she talked about was getting a three year we would call Student Affairs. I work at a university I work itch, how she would come in and learn a job and then your to implement things and make it her own. And year three, do it in her sleep. And that's something I had heard a previous boss of mine, Jeff Newell, I know you're out there. He had talked about the same three year rotation with me when I worked at Renison University College at the University of Waterloo. And that directly with students trying to make their experience better was a three year contract working in residence a lot like what Nadia was talking about. And Nadia also talked about how the variety of experiences she had helped her get to where she is. So when that contract ran out, and she ended up going over to the International Student Center side of things, that experience came back years later to help her get the manager job while they're at the university. And in particular, I work with in the International Student Center at U of T. And that was different from residents where she had spent a lot of time and where she thought she wanted to go back to. But sometimes you go back to where you think you're supposed to be. And you find out, it's not the same thing you remember, and you realize, maybe student clubs and student organizations. I help them you've got to move on and try something else. I also really appreciated that she talked about sometimes you just have to do things for the career benefit that you'll get out of it. So like her master's degree, for example, when she started that it was all about just seeing that everyone else navigate University policies. I help them manage events, I help was doing it, and that she should do it or needed to do it to keep up. Although later in the interview, she talks about maybe one day a PhD is in her future. So clearly academics are more on her mind now than when she started that master's program. And on the topic of school, she talked about how them manage conflicts between personnel in the club. And I balancing full time work and doing school at the same time was hard. And I got to see that from her and other people in my office when we were gonna have social gatherings on the evening. And they instead had to go to class or go to homework. I even tried it for a bit, I took one course to see if I would be also wanted to interview Nadia so I could hear her full career interested in a master's program. And it was good and sort of a nightmare. At the same time. I ended up doing okay in terms of grades. But the stress of having to leave work early drive downtown, take a class get home late at night, and then know that I had two nights worth of homework to do was a little path, how she got from where she was to where she is now, because more than I was willing to take on at that point in time. Two other things came up in the interview that I think are going to be kind of a pattern that I'm going to see when I talk to other people as well. And one of those was that transferable skills are just that very transferable, and there'll be with you in whatever job you're doing. Not he made the decision that to a certain extent is the career path I've always thought to instead of taking a master's in a student affairs field, and maybe pigeonholing yourself, she took one that she could take with her and use if he ever does end up as the director of a community center one day. And the other thing I think will come up in future interviews is something I said which was put I was on. But there's definitely been some moments where I've yourself in a position to get lucky. And when I listen back to it, I wanted to clarify what I mean by that is if you do good work, people around you will notice and they're gonna find reasons to help you get to where you want to be. I have to believe people are inherently good and want to help people started to question that. And so I wanted to hear from someone around them. And it doesn't mean that you're good work. And your hard work will be noticed all the time. But it certainly doesn't hurt to try. So that wraps up all my thoughts about Nadia's talk. And now I want to give some podcast updates, which I'm not sure if they're going to become a regular everyday occurrence on who has been through a lot of the same things I have been and the show. But certainly periodically I'll give you some information. And this week, I just really want to thank everyone who's supported the show so far. All the sharing the posts on Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram to help let people know that the show exists. Thanks for all the positive feedback, the text messages DM's, thanks to the people who is just farther along in their field. So is hearing all that have never met who messaged me on LinkedIn saying they liked the podcast that was really appreciated. And thanks to my badass wife Natasha for being conscripted as my social media manager. She is managing the new Instagram account I created at @career_ crossroads. So go and take a look at that and comment going to help me get to that point? Well, that is yet to be on some of the pictures. Let me know what you think of the various episodes I realized it's probably more accessible than an email address and it's going to allow other people to chime in as well. So Instagram for now, maybe we'll get to Facebook at determined. But what I can do for now is at least reflect back some point. I also wanted to share that literally on the day of launch. One of my cousin's texted me asking me for Robbie's contact information - Robbie from Episode Two, because he wanted to know if Robbie could make some table legs for him. So if I achieve nothing else during this podcast, I have at least drummed on a few things she said, and maybe down the line, I'll listen up some business for Robbie. So I'm going to call that a success. And the last thing I want to talk about is just some Statistics because I don't know about you, but I like some numbers. So I want to let you know that there were over 250 downloads by the time I went to bed on Saturday night, which is to this again, and it'll help me maybe you're listening to this, a much better start than I could have imagined. And the really cool fact for me is those downloads up to the download number right now have come from 61 cities in nine countries on three continents. So in particular shout outs to whoever is listening in Hamilton city, Bermuda. I don't know you, but and it'll help you. So let's reflect for a minute. I'm glad you found the show. Of course, I'm glad the rest of you found it as well. So go check us out on Instagram at career underscore crossroads. and tune in next week for another story from a guy named Corey